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New York Times bestselling author Kristine Kathryn Rusch writes in almost every genre. Generally, she uses her real name (Rusch) for most of her writing. Under that name, she publishes bestselling science fiction and fantasy, award-winning mysteries, acclaimed mainstream fiction, controversial nonfiction, and the occasional romance. Her novels have made bestseller lists around the world and her short fiction has appeared in eighteen best of the year collections. She has won more than twenty-five awards for her fiction, including the Hugo, Le Prix Imaginales, the Asimov's Readers Choice award, and the Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine Readers Choice Award.

Publications from The Chicago Tribune to Booklist have included her Kris Nelscott mystery novels in their top-ten-best mystery novels of the year. The Nelscott books have received nominations for almost every award in the mystery field, including the best novel Edgar Award, and the Shamus Award.

She also edits. Beginning with work at the innovative publishing company, Pulphouse, followed by her award-winning tenure at The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, she took fifteen years off before returning to editing with the original anthology series Fiction River, published by WMG Publishing. She acts as series editor with her husband, writer Dean Wesley Smith, and edits at least two anthologies in the series per year on her own.

To keep up with everything she does, go to kriswrites.com and sign up for her newsletter. To track her many pen names and series, see their individual websites (krisnelscott.com, kristinegrayson.com, krisdelake.com, retrievalartist.com, divingintothewreck.com). Her latest release, Escaping Amnthra is available now.

Fiction River Presents: Cats! edited by Kristine Kathryn Rusch

Cats display many qualities, from marvelousness and brilliance to affection and exasperation (humans never live up to their expectations.) These stories cover all of that and more. In this latest volume of Fiction River Presents, some of our favorite writers capture the mystique of these fabulous felines with warmth, some magic (goes with cats), insight, and even some suspense. Find out why Adventures Fantastic says: "If you haven't checked out Fiction River yet, you should. There's something for everyone."

Includes:
"Queen of the Mouse Riders" by Annie Reed
"Fur Tsunami" by Kent Patterson
"Speechless in Seattle" by Lisa Silverthorne
"Cat and Mice" by Jamie McNabb
"The Magic Cat of The Hidden Springs Inn and Spa" by Kari Kilgore
"The Secret of Catnip" by Stefon Mears
"Helmie" by Kristine Kathryn Rusch

CURATOR'S NOTE

I love cat stories, and because I do, I tend to buy a lot of them when I'm editing. All are wonderful, but some are extremely memorable. So I put together a collection of the most memorable stories so that I could share them easily. – Kristine Kathryn Rusch

 

REVIEWS

  • "[Fiction River] is one of the best and most exciting publications in the field today. Check out an issue and see why I say that."

    – Keith West, Adventures Fantastic
  • "… fans of the unconventional will be well satisfied."

    – Publishers Weekly on Fiction River: Pulse Pounders
 

BOOK PREVIEW

Excerpt

Introduction
Magic: Vicious, Sharp, and Oh, So Cute
Kristine Kathryn Rusch

Cats. They're wonderful, brilliant, affectionate, and infuriating. Just tonight, as I prepared to write this introduction, my two boys—one an eighteen-pound half-Siamese cat who thinks he's still the tiny kitten with big ears he once was and the other a six-pound mostly blind Birman who pretends he isn't running the house at all—decided to play-fight. Lots of screaming, lots of hair pulling, and lots of leaping ensued. I've learned not to get involved.

If I stay out of it, I don't get scratched, and besides, it always ends the same way—with the both of them eating kibble, shoving each other affectionately to make room at the same bowl. Rather like adult humans who argue over sports and end up at the bar not an hour later, laughing and slapping each other on the back.

I've had cats since I moved out of my parents' house when I was nineteen. Generations of cats, generations of stories. Each cat had their own little bit of magic. There was the full Siamese, Buglet, who could best Dean in any contest of wills. I still dream about her, but in the dreams, she's a beautiful woman with long dark hair who gives me mysterious looks from across the living room. There was Galahad, the rather stuck-up orange cat, who ran our household with an iron paw—and who still does, truth be told, even though he's been gone for years now. Not to mention Spike, who would look on our current boys with disdain, figuring they aren't impish enough.

People who live with cats have a multitude of cat stories, and some of those stories are filled with the inexplicable. That's why so many fictional cat stories combine the feline with the magical.

We've published a lot of cat stories at WMG, and we'll be publishing more. I had the choice of a lot of tones as I combed through our inventory. Dark? Filled with heartbreak? Funny? Warm? Sweet?

I decided to forgo the heartbreak this time, more or less, (although there's one exception, depending on how tenderhearted you are). I went for the warm and magical instead, along with a bit of insight. There's also some suspense and tension.

In most of these stories, the cat is the hero. In all of them, the cat is the center of the story. In one, the cat is the villain—and I must confess, that story just might be my favorite of all of these tales. (Tails?)

I love them all, though. I picked them from memory, then went back to double-check myself and reread each one, enjoying it more the second (or third or fourth) time.

I was having a wonderful evening until the fight erupted, and the fur started to fly. It's hard to read when cats are yowling at each other, before heading off to loudly crunch kibble.

I hope it's a bit quieter where you are, and that no fur is floating through the air. I also hope you enjoy these stories as much as I do.

Have fun!

—Kristine Kathryn Rusch
Las Vegas, Nevada
January 14, 2020